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Drake Passage

The infamous Drake Passage extends about 1,000 km (600 miles) between Cape Horn and the South Shetland Islands. To reach the Antarctic Peninsula it is necessary to traverse this stretch of water at right angles to the current flow. This, coupled with the propensity for high winds in the region, can cause rough seas, and conditions sometimes referred to as the “Drake Shake.” While the seas can be quite lively, our vessels have stabilizers designed for this type of weather.

Conversely, the “Drake Lake” is occasionally encountered when the passage is calm. Many people consider the Drake Passage a rite of passage on their voyage to the Antarctic.

On all Antarctic voyages, the crossing takes approximately 48 hours in favorable conditions. Due to the great unpredictability of the weather patterns, it is really just up to chance which Drake you will experience.

DRAKE PASSAGE VIDEO >

Photo taken by a Quark passengerPhoto taken by a Quark passengerPhoto taken by a Quark passengerThe infamous Drake Passage extends about 1,000 km (600 miles) between Cape Horn and the South Shetland Islands. To reach the Antarctic Peninsula it is necessary to traverse this stretch of water at right angles to the current flow. This, coupled with the propensity for high winds in the region, can cause rough seas, and conditions sometimes referred to as the “Drake Shake.” While the seas can be quite lively, our vessels have stabilizers designed for this type of weather.  Conversely, the “Drake Lake” is ocThe infamous Drake Passage extends about 1,000 km (600 miles) between Cape Horn and the South Shetland Islands. To reach the Antarctic Peninsula it is necessary to traverse this stretch of water at right angles to the current flow. This, coupled with the propensity for high winds in the region, can cause rough seas, and conditions sometimes referred to as the “Drake Shake.” While the seas can be quite lively, our vessels have stabilizers designed for this type of weather.  Conversely, the “Drake Lake” is ocPhoto taken by a Quark passengerPhoto taken by a Quark passenger