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Ultimate Arctic Voyage: From Svalbard to Jan Mayen to Iceland
Arctic
Ultimate Arctic Voyage From Svalbard to Jan Mayen to Iceland

Ultimate Arctic Voyage From Svalbard to Jan Mayen to Iceland

Starting From:
£6,472 GBP
Duration:
13 days

Perfect for first-time visitors to the Arctic who are seeking lots of adventure, our Ultimate Arctic Voyage: From Svalbard to Jan Mayen to Iceland itinerary highlights three spectacular destinations near the top of the world. This journey provides adventurous guests with a taste of the incredible diversity of the Arctic, featuring wildlife, giant icebergs, towering mountains, historical sites, wide expanses of tundra and more.

Your adventure begins in the remote Norwegian island of Spitsbergen, renowned for its stunning scenery and abundant, varied wildlife such as polar bears and walrus. From there, sail south across the Greenland Sea to the mysterious, volcanic Jan Mayen, a nature reserve so remote that few have ever been fortunate enough to explore this Arctic treasure. Your epic adventure culminates with a journey under the midnight sun to Reykjavik, where you can soak up Icelandic culture in a city that never sleeps.

Polar Bear (Photo captured with a telephoto lens from a responsible distance, following regulatory / AECO guidelines)
Expedition in Brief

Search for iconic Arctic wildlife, such as polar bears, walrus and reindeer

Explore the magnificent fjords and glaciers of Spitsbergen

Experience the remote volcanic island of Jan Mayen

Cruise in a Zodiac to explore glaciers, icebergs and more

Immerse yourself in the icy realm of the Arctic with optional kayaking adventures 

Make Your Polar Dream a Reality

All we need is a little bit of information about your travel preferences and one of our Polar Travel Advisors will be in touch.

Your Ships

When it comes to polar expeditions, you’re only as good as where your ships can take you. And our diverse fleet of small polar vessels, which includes icebreakers and expedition ships, can take you to places larger ships can’t navigate. View All of Our Ships

Ice Class

1A+

PC6

Cruising Speed

16 knots

in open water

Guests

199

Staff and Crew

140

Ultramarine - Deck 2
Deck 2

Ultramarine's off-ship adventures start here on Deck 2. This is where you’ll find the efficiently-designed Ready Rooms A and B next to the Zodiac hangar, where you'll embark on your off-ship adventure options. Ultramarine’s two ready rooms include an individual locker for each guest to safely store and dry personal items and expedition gear between outings. They're  also equipped with benches that are handy when changing attire before or after off-ship excursions. Zodiac embarkation is at water-level which makes for quick deployment.

Ultramarine - Deck 3
Deck 3

Deck 3 is where you’ll find Reception, where a crew member is available (during posted hours) to assist you. It’s also where you’ll purchase internet or email access cards and phone cards, arrange for a wake-up call, or settle your accounts at the end of the voyage. Also on Deck 3 is the Polar Boutique, which is stocked with expedition gear and a selection of polar souvenirs. The Clinic is located on Deck 3, as are the Explorer Triples and the Explorer Suites (two of which offer modified layouts and bathrooms for wheelchair accessibility).

  • Explorer Suite
  • Explorer Triple
Ultramarine - Deck 4
Deck 4

Deck 4 offers guests two categories of suites. The Balcony Suites feature one double or two single beds, and a 52 sq. ft. (4.8 sq. m) balcony, a refrigerator, safe, TV, and a bathroom with shower and heated floors. (Some Balcony Suites offer interconnecting rooms.) The larger Deluxe Balcony Suites feature one double or two single beds, a 70 sq. ft. (6.5 sq. m) balcony, refrigerator, safe, TV, and a bathroom with shower, bathtub and heated floors.

  • Deluxe Balcony Suite
  • Balcony Suite
Ultramarine - Deck 5
Deck 5

Deck 5 is home to Balena restaurant, featuring tables that accommodate 2 to 10 guests. Every seat in Ultramarine’s main restaurant offers views of the wraparound deck. At the opposite end of Deck 5 is the state-of-the-art Ambassador Theatre, where guests enjoy daily presentations and films on the high-definition LED wall screen. This space is large enough to accommodate all guests.

Ultramarine - Deck 6
Deck 6

During your voyage you may be granted access to the Bridge to observe how the Captain and officers sail and navigate the ship. This is an excellent opportunity to learn how your vessel operates. Strict etiquette applies during Bridge visits which can be facilitated through the Expedition Leader. Also on Deck 6 is a selection of Deluxe Balcony Suites, Ultra Suite, Solo Panorama, Owner’s Suite and Terrace Suites.

  • Ultra Suite
  • Owner's Suite
  • Terrace Suite
  • Deluxe Balcony Suite
  • Solo Panorama
  • Balcony Suite
Ultramarine - Deck 7
Deck 7

Guests can go to Deck 7 to visit Bistro 487, an alternative dining option to the larger Balena restaurant. Here, they'll enjoy selections from the main menu, healthy eating options and light snacks, as well as an early riser’s breakfast, afternoon tea and late night snacks. Also on Deck 7 are the Sauna (with floor-to-ceiling windows), the Library, Tundra Spa, a gym with the latest fitness equipment, and studio space for informal yoga.

  • Penthouse Suite
Ultramarine - Deck 8
Deck 8

Ultramarine’s two twin-engine H145 helicopters enable guests to enjoy the largest selection of off-ship adventures, all of which start at the two helidecks. It’s here on Deck 8 that guests will safely board the two helicopters to experience more unique aerial perspectives and heli-supported activities than are possible on any other ship in the industry.

Included Activities

Passengers Hiking in Svalbard
Hiking

Hiking

Hiking in the polar regions differs from your typical trail experience. Here, in a tree-less terrain, you are the tallest figure on the landscape as you walk over spongy tundra, crusty snow or sandy beaches in remotes parts of the... Read more
Passenger getting ready for a polar plunge in the Arctic

Polar Plunge

The Polar Plunge is scheduled once during each voyage. Throughout the journey, the Expedition Leader and Captain constantly monitor conditions in order to choose the optimal time and location. The Polar Plunge sometimes takes plac... Read more
Zodiac cruising in the Arctic
Zodiac

Zodiac Cruising

Zodiacs are used for transferring you ashore, transporting your luggage when necessary and for taking you ocean-level cruising among icebergs, whales and seabirds. During the expedition, you will visit remote and isolated sites th... Read more

Adventure Options

Paddling excursion in the Arctic
Paddling

Paddling Excursion

Every sweep of the paddle as your craft glides through the pristine polar waters creates an incredible soundtrack: the jostle of glacial ice, the lapping of waves against the rocky shore, the perpetual drip from your paddle, the c... Read more
Passengers kayaking in Arctic Landscape

Sea Kayaking

Positioning yourself in the seat of a kayak is one of the most intimate ways travelers can connect with the polar regions—at water level, up close, where you can touch and feel every polar sensation imaginable. The Sea Kayak Progr... Read more

Possible Excursions

When traveling in extremely remote regions, your Expedition Team must consider the sea, ice and weather to guide the route and itinerary details. The following sites are a sample of what you may experience on your expedition, whether by ship, Zodiac cruise, helicopter, or shore landing.

Reykjavík

Iceland has been ranked by the United Nations as one of the best countries in which to live. Its capital, Reykjavík (which means “Smoky Bay”), was named by the country’s first settler, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson, who was inspired by the geothermal mist rising from the ground.

Beerenberg

Covered in glaciers, this active volcano dominates the northern half of Jan Mayen, taking up a significant part of the island’s mere 144 square miles (373 sq km). A soaring 7,470-feet (2,277 meters) high, it last erupted in 1985. Let ́s hope for clear skies to admire this monolith from the ship or shore.

Kvalrossbukta

One of only two possible landing sites on Jan Mayen is Kvalrossbukta. This small bay is the site of the remains of a 17-century whaling station. The island is home to a variety of birdlife, including a large colony of northern fulmar, which is also located here.

Olonkinbyen

Jan Mayen’s only settlement, Olonkinbyen is located at the southeastern side of the island, by Båtvika (Boat Cove), the other possible landing site. As a designated nature reserve, Jan Mayen remains uninhabited, except for the 18 rotating personnel who reside in the settlement and work at either the nearby weather station or radio station.

14th of July Glacier

Named after France’s Bastille Day (the 14th of July), this large glacier is situated in Krossfjord, a bay on the northwest coast of Spitsbergen. The area is teeming with wildlife, and is the best place in Svalbard to catch a glimpse of the Atlantic puffin. Nesting at certain times of year along the shore are purple sandpipers, common eiders, barnacle geese, Arctic tern and Brünnich’s guillemots (thick-billed murres). Bearded and ringed seals also frequent the waters here.

Poolepynten

This flat peninsula lies on the east coast of Prins Karls Forland (Prince Charles Foreland), which is part of a national park (est. 1973) that includes both the island and the surrounding sea. Poolepynten is a great place for walrus viewing and photography. Encountering a walrus haul-out is a moment you won’t forget. These lumbering giants of the Arctic create quite a noisy scene as each walrus vies for a choice spot of coastline.

Smeerenburg

Surrounded by fjords, glacier fronts and rugged mountains, the abandoned settlement of Smeerenburg, which means “blubber town,” was established by Dutch whalers nearly 400 years ago. One of Europe’s most northerly outposts, this is a good spot to explore ashore and learn about Spitsbergen’s whaling history. You can also visit a memorial erected in 1906 to honor the whalers who lost their lives in the 17th and 18th centuries. A walrus haul-out can sometimes be seen here.

Lilliehöök Glacier

In 2005, nearly 100 years after his great- great-grandfather conducted scientific investigations here, Prince Albert II of Monaco returned to Lilliehöök Glacier to further our understanding of the Arctic clam, a species that lives for more than a century. Here, you can take a Zodiac cruise amid labyrinths of sparkling icebergs, and witness breathtaking panoramas of ice. You may even spot bearded seals hauled out on the floes.

Longyearbyen

Home to 2,400 people, the administrative capital of Svalbard is situated on the southern side of Adventfjord.The settlement was founded in 1905 by John Munroe Longyear, the majority owner of the Arctic Coal Company of Boston. Today as much as ever, this is a true frontier town.

Monaco Glacier

Prince Albert I of Monaco, a pioneer of oceanography, led an expedition to Svalbard in 1906. His team used sophisticated photographic techniques to understand the shape and position of several glacier fronts. Monaco Glacier honors the expedition, the prince and the principality over which he reigned. While touring the glacier front by Zodiac cruise, listen to the crackle and pop of the brash ice, search for seals and have a chance to admire a natural sculpture gallery.

Departure Dates and Cabins

Showing 1 - 1 of 1 Departures
Make Your Polar Dream a Reality

All we need is a little bit of information about your travel preferences and one of our Polar Travel Advisors will be in touch.

Extend Your Trip

Helsinki Cathedral (Helsinki, Finland)

Helsinki, Finland

The city of Helsinki is actually an archipelago of 315 islands that contains scores of lush green parks and what seems like an endless string of dark blue lakes. Often called the “Daughter of the Baltic,” Finland’s capital sits on a peninsula in the Gulf of Finland. The architecture of Scandinavia is a startling mix of traditional wooden and stone houses mixed in with tall glass towers and office blocks that reflect contemporary Scandinavian minimalism and art-nouveau modern.

Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre in Reykjavík, Iceland

Reykjavík, Iceland

Not only is Reykjavík the social and cultural hub of Iceland, but it’s also one of the most walkable capitals in the world. Most of the city’s main attractions and venues can be reached on foot, which is not surprising for a capital with only 230,000 inhabitants. Iceland’s entire population is about 360,000. The country’s Viking roots are traced in Reykjavík's major museums, yet the city, located on the southern shore of Faxaflói Bay, is the perfect base for anyone with a yearning to connect with nature and the outdoors. The range of options includes whale watching, geothermal pools, glacier walking, and kayak tours.