King Penguin

photo taken by Quark Passenger

Full grown, King Penguins can be up to three feet tall and weigh up to 35 pounds

photo taken by Quark Passenger

Photo taken by Quark passenger

King Penguins breed on the subantarctic islands at the northern reaches of Antarctica, South Georgia, and other temperate islands of the region.

Photo taken by Quark passenger

Photo taken by Quark passenger

King penguin colonies are occupied all the year round either by the chicks or the adults

Photo taken by Quark passenger

Photo taken by Quark passenger

King penguins have colourful feathers around their necks and heads

Photo taken by Quark passenger

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

There is an estimated world population of 2 million breeding pairs

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

Photo by Quark passenger

The chicks may lose up to 50% of their body weight in these intervals where they wait for a parent to return and feed them.

Photo by Quark passenger

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

The baby chicks have fuzzy brown feathers for about a year after they are born.

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

Their tall and slender build gives them a type of posture and movement that you usually don’t see with other penguins

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

King Penguins are known to dive more than 900 feet in order to gain access to the food source that they really want

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

The King Penguin is the second largest species of penguin at about 11 to 16 kg

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

Quark Passenger taking in the sight of the massive King Penguin rookery

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

Photo taken by Quark Passneger

They cannot go into the water until they have lost their fluffy brown juvenile

Photo taken by Quark Passneger

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

King penguins leave the colony where they were born when they have fledged fully and so are able to swim in the sea and catch their own food.

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

King Penguins eat small fish, mainly lanternfish, and squid

Photo taken by Quark Passenger

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